Facts About Flagstaff

Facts About Flagstaff

History of Flagstaff

Legend has it, Flagstaff’s name came about when the first settlers of the community erected a pole constructed from a tall Ponderosa Pine and attached the flag to it to celebrate the Declaration of Independence Centennial in 1876.

Situated on the Colorado Plateau, our mountain town Flagstaff is surrounded by beautiful tall pines, scenic mountainous landscaping and breathtaking views. Located near the base of the sacred mountains, the San Francisco Peaks, Arizona’s highest point at 12,633 feet, Flagstaff’s history is intertwined with rich cultural and historic beauty. Flagstaff is the county seat for Coconino County, the second largest county in the United States with 12 million acres. At an altitude of 7,000 feet reside over 60,000 people, who take pleasure in enjoying nature at its best. Flagstaff is located at the intersection of Interstate 17 and I-40, approximately 143 miles north of Phoenix, and is a paradise with four seasonal periods.

Many Arizonans maintain a second home here, where the average summer temperatures are 20 degrees cooler than the desert lands of Phoenix. In the winter months, residents and tourists enjoy skiing, ice skating and hunting.
Source for the following information: Greater Flagstaff Economic Council, 1998.

Climate Averages

  • Annual High………………….61°F
  • Annual Low………………….30.5°F
  • January High…………………42.2°F
  • July High……………………..81.9°F
  • Annual Precipitation…………22.8 inches
  • Annual Snowfall…………….108.8 inches
  • Days of Sunshine…………….Nearly 300 days

Local Industry

Flagstaff supports a stable diversified economy. The following is a list of various large employers in Flagstaff:

Arizona Public Service Company (APS)
City of Flagstaff
Coconino Community College (CCC)
Coconino County
Connect Tech International
Flagstaff Athletic Club
Flagstaff Medical Center
Flagstaff Unified School District (FUSD)
Grand Canyon Railway
Joy Cone
Machine Solutions
Nackard Beverage Company
New England Business Services (NEBS)
Northern Arizona University (NAU)
Prent Thermoforming
Ralston Purina Company
Southwest Wind Power
Sterner and Klein
Walgreens Distribution
W.L. Gore Associates

Transportation

Air – Pulliam Airport, located four miles south of downtown Flagstaff on I-17, provides frequent daily flights to and from Phoenix, where national and international connections can be made. Federal Express and UPS air cargo carriers fly direct.

Ground Transportation – Flagstaff is a major crossroads for ground transportation in the West. I-40 runs from the east to west coasts, and from Flagstaff provides one-day ground access to west coast markets such as Salt Lake City, San Francisco, Las Vegas, Albuquerque, El Paso, Los Angeles, San Diego, and parts of Mexico. Southern markets, such as Phoenix and Tucson, are available via I-17. US Highway 89 serves the states north of Arizona, and US Highway 180 accesses the Grand Canyon.

Freight Rail – Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railway serves the City of Flagstaff with approximately 130 trains passing through town each day. Spur lines are available on some industrial sites.

Passenger Rail – The Southwest Chief, operated by Amtrak, services Flagstaff twice daily connecting with Los Angeles to the West and Chicago to the East.

Industrial & Office Parks

There are nine industrial and office parks located throughout the greater Flagstaff area.

Economics

The Flagstaff area has numerous assets that allow it to compete favorably with other cities of similar size. A highly rated quality of life, excellent educational opportunities enhanced by NAU and CCC, and a motivated, educated and qualified work force enable Flagstaff to meet the economic challenges of today and the future. Flagstaff’s traditional economic base of government, education, transportation and tourism is diversifying and broadening, thanks in part to several science and high technology research and development companies that have chosen to locate in our community.

Labor Force & Wage Rates

The population of Coconino County is approximately 125,000 with a civilian workforce of 68,000. The median household income is approximately $40,000 annually.
WAGE RATES

Job Description Annual Weighted Avg.

  • Administrative Asst……………..………$27,900
  • Automotive Mechanic ………………….$31,100
  • Systems Analyst ………………………..$41,610
  • Electrician ………………………………$26,030
  • Engineer, Civil …………………………$47,690
  • Food Service/Lodging Mgr …………….$33,075
  • General Office Clerk ..…………………$19,280
  • Legal Secretary ..………….……………$23,920
  • Licensed Practical Nurse ……………….$29,110
  • Production/Mfg., skilled ……………….$29,380
  • Sales Person, retail ……………………..$16,130
  • Truck Operator, light …………………..$20,920

Source: 1999 Arizona Department of Economic Security.

Utilities in Flagstaff

With very few exceptions home within the city limits are serviced by the following utilities:

  • Electric
  • Arizona Power Supply
  • Natural Gas
  • Unisource
  • Water, sewer,trash & recycling
  • City of Flagstaff
  • Cable
  • Cablevision of Flagstaff
  • Phone
  • Qwest

Some areas outside of town are not serviced by natural gas so gas appliances and furnaces use propane. Several companies in town rent or sell tanks and deliver propane.

The area north and east of Flagstaff, generally referred to as Doney Park, has a private water company and most lots have standard septic systems. Some neighborhoods in this area have natural gas while many are still on propane.
Most homes north of Flagstaff in Fort Valley have well water wth well depths ranging from about 50 to 300 feet. Many standard septic systems are still in service but alternative systems are more common and currently permitted at a cost of well over $15,000.

Water is a precious commodity in Arizona. Flagstaff gets its water from the Inner Basin on the San Francisco Peaks, the Lake Mary Reservoir (about 10 miles south of Flagstaff) and from several well fields.

Many areas do not have access to water because of water table and the rocky geology.

In these areas homeowners “haul water.” Many people moving from outside Arizona find this unacceptable, but if one wants to live out of town and “away from it all,” sometimes there is no alternative. Most people in this situation have a cistern (commonly 2000 to 5000 gallons) that they fill with water. It is then pumped into the home and from there on there is NO difference in how you use water except that most people who haul tend to be more conservative. There are two ways to haul water. Many people have a tank on the back of their truck and pay about the same rate as city water users. If the homeowner does not want to be bothered they can have their water delivered on an as needed basis for 4-5 cents per gallon.

  • John Wason is a great realtor. He works really hard for his clients. He helped us find our dream home in downtown Flagstaff for the right price and we really appreciated all the work that he did for us.

    Kim Sargent & Joe Murry
  • When he was working with us, he did an excellent job finding us a buyer quick and sold our house. It was just an excellent experience.

    Wayne Anderson
  • Let's talk about how we can help you: